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Real bikes for Real People

Our Name is Our Story

Behind the Brodie name, is Paul Brodie. Originally an artist and motorcycle fanatic, he began painting and brass-welding frames for mountain bikes in 1985. It wasn't long before he invented and trademarked the Vancouver sloping top tube, launching a brand of bikes bearing the Brodie name. On September 29th, 2005, Paul was inducted into the Mountain Bike Hall of Fame at Interbike in Las Vegas, creating an international fan base for the Vancouver brand. Today, Brodie bikes are a product of our passion and a proud part of our local community.

A Better Ride With You in Mind

A Brodie isn't just a bike, it's a right of passage. Built with the individual rider in mind, Brodie bikes are built to blaze the trails of your choosing. From epic off-roading to beachside cruising, there's a Brodie that's right for you. Over the years, we've built our fair share of bikes and each one has played a role in shaping who we've become. I n fact, don't be surprised if after all these years, we still remember your 2003 White Holeshot or 2008 Root Beer Ronin. We're a small company and better yet, a community. We're not about making hundreds of different models (just to have hundreds of different models). We're about making original, quality bikes from concept to production so the bike you love now, is the bike you'll love for the years to come.

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Brodie Bicycles 2016

We welcome you to a stress-free environment, a place where you can escape from this thing called life. With roots that sprouted in Vancouver BC, we’re excited to be a part of the nation wide movement of a more sustainable future and quality of life.

The 2016 season marks our 30th anniversary and we’d like to thank you for all of your continued support and love! We’ve come a long way since the beginnings of Brodie’s workshop: Journeyed through the birth of North Shore mountain biking, the freeride years and into the realm of cyclocross and bikepacking, all while paying homage to the road and commuter riding that drive our business. We mark the start of our third decade with a few special projects, and some new product coming in early 2016.

We wish you all the best in the New Year and look forward to being there with you on all your cycling trips, commutes and adventures!

#brodiebikes

 

 

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A recap of Andrea’s first Bike to Work Week: 5 Life Lessons

Last week, I had the pleasure  of being invited to participate in Vancouver’s Bike to Work Week  initiative. The team, and destination: Electronic Arts Burnaby.

Now – not only do I own a car, but I work unconventional hours – AND – it’s about 12 kms, uphill (both ways, obviously). There has never really been a compelling reason to ride my bike to work, or take transit for that matter (I drive a Prius, isn’t that basically almost transit?) until I was asked to join this team. Why would I say yes? Well, I’m not one to shy away from anything that builds community, and to be honest: I’ve actually said “I’d love to ride my bike more, but….” and I was openly thrilled at the idea of having an opportunity to try it.

Day one! Biking to Work!
Day one! Biking to Work!

So, I did it. I rode my bike to work. How did it go? It was perfect. It was absolutely perfect and in the beautiful, tree-lined streets of my “morning ride” (no really, go watch that video) – I knew that I had a lot to share from my experience of totally going for something that you’ve always wanted to try.

1. In the absence of talent and experience, effort will count

If you’re trying something brand new, this is it. I’ve wholeheartedly embraced a solid 1:1 ratio of effort and showing up. I have been dead-last in Crossfit workouts, I have finished marathons with old people and I’ve fallen flat on my face in a trail race (that only happened once). I also considered walking my bike up every hill in front of me. But here’s the thing: I got better. You will too. You will improve at everything that you consistently show up for. Effort counts.

My ride!
My ride!

2. Commitment must trump excuses

I made a commitment to do this project. On the 1st day it was raining, on the 2nd day I had a meeting and no way of getting my clothes to work. On the 3rd day, I had to pick my son up from the bus and on the 4th day I was so tired I couldn’t fathom the idea of getting on my bike. They’re all reasonable excuses but I know (from experience) that those reasonable excuses will literally suck the results right out of you. What kind of results was I after? Completion. I was interested in doing what I said I was going to do. If you’re looking to try something new (like exercise?), please make a commitment – to yourself. You’re the only one you should be trying to impress.

This guy.
This guy.

3. No seriously, ask for help.

On the first day, I followed someone to work and ACTUALLY said “um, could you tell me how you use your gears?”. He didn’t laugh, he just answered.

Asking for help is generally like that.

I went to my family, employer,  neighbourhood bike shop, the HUB community, some local businesses and my co-workers. I asked for help. Not ONE person turned me away.

At the HUB Office picking up Bike Route maps!
At the HUB Office picking up Bike Route maps!

EA made sure there were no barriers for any of us, HUB gave us everything we needed, someone at work let me follow him all the way to work, someone else let me follow him home. My family made my lunch for me. My coworkers forgave me for being 45 minutes late on day 2 when I got lost. I TOLD them all that I had made this commitment and needed help. TRY THAT!

4. Tools Matter

Born and raised at Studeo55 – the professional athletes I work with taught me that looking good is feeling good and feeling good is playing good. No, I kid (sort of). Let’s just talk for a minute about getting the right tools. It’s a Tony Robbins thing. If you’ve made the commitment, you’ve asked for help and you’re taking action – just make sure that your tools aren’t holding you back. Case in point: my bike felt weird, asked for help – turns out it’s the wrong size for me. Get the right tools: don’t let that be a silly excuse for not doing something you’ve always wanted to do.

MEC Aid Station! I need help! Tools matters
MEC Aid Station! I need help! Tools matters

5. Hills make you stronger

I knew this, but I asked Coach Patrick for the science. You increase the resistance, you increase your strength. No effort, no gains. It is that simple. Does getting stronger matter? That’s up to you.

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On the 5th day – I rode tree-lined streets with ease, crushed the hills that only days before I had contemplated walking up. I arrived to a party that EA threw for us. Local business came, teammates came, the high-fives abounded. We all rode our bikes to work that week – maybe some of us tried something new – maybe some of us got stronger (I know I did). And I bought a new bike on Sunday.

We are in the working hard business at Studeo55, and we salute every effort you make.  Those things you’ve always wanted to try? Go do them.

Electronic Arts Team 2015!
Electronic Arts Team 2015!

“Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving.”
– Albert Einstein

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